not sure if..
not sure if..
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mmmskulljuice:

dynamicoceans:

Swimming crabs are characterized by the flattening of the fifth pair of legs into broad paddles, which are used for swimming. This ability, together with their strong, sharp claws, allows many species to be fast and aggressive predators.
Video

Alien fighter approaching, captain
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thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
thebristolboard:

A gallery of original science-fiction and fantasy paintings by Mike Dubisch.
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dryptosaurus:

Coelophysis by Doug Henderson
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paleoillustration:

Leptoceratops and Stegosaurus by Doug Henderson.
"In a lot of palaeoart, the animals will practically be jumping down our throats, as if they’re putting on a show for us (it’s almost possible to smell the popcorn). Instead, Henderson offers us furtive glimpses through the thick underbrush of a world that is as lush and filled with life as it is hostile and unwelcoming. Dinosaurs, so often depicted as the lords of the Earth, are typically hopelessly dwarfed by their surroundings. There’s something so very real about it all." Keep reading Marc Vincent’s post on Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs.
paleoillustration:

Leptoceratops and Stegosaurus by Doug Henderson.
"In a lot of palaeoart, the animals will practically be jumping down our throats, as if they’re putting on a show for us (it’s almost possible to smell the popcorn). Instead, Henderson offers us furtive glimpses through the thick underbrush of a world that is as lush and filled with life as it is hostile and unwelcoming. Dinosaurs, so often depicted as the lords of the Earth, are typically hopelessly dwarfed by their surroundings. There’s something so very real about it all." Keep reading Marc Vincent’s post on Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs.
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paleoillustration:

"Doug Henderson’s work is frequently distinguished by its expert use of elaborate foliage, so it’s interesting to see a piece like this, in which two drowned centrosaurs appear (at first glance) to be suspended in an ethereal void. There is a wonderful dreamlike quality here - we are strangers in this alien world, which belongs to the plesiosaur, itself heedless to the dramatic sight of the giant animals’ bodies drifting idly by above. Equally, there is a beautiful melancholy, as in so much of Henderson’s art" Marc Vincent on Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs
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fairytalesinred:

Doug Henderson
Source: http://chasmosaurs.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/vintage-dinosaur-art-de-oerwereld-van_15.html
Via: http://paleoillustration.tumblr.com/
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dryptosaurus:

Coelophysis by Doug Henderson
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wonderful-strange:

R. Crumb
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